Oral corticosteroids pharmacology

Reports of acute toxicity and/or deaths following overdosage with glucocorticoids are rare. No antidote is available. Treatment is probably not indicated for reactions due to chronic poisoning unless the patient has a condition that would render him unusually susceptible to ill effects from corticosteroids. In this case, the stomach should be emptied and symptomatic treatment should be instituted as necessary. Anaphylactic and hypersensitivity reactions may be treated with epinephrine (adrenaline), positive-pressure artificial respiration and aminophylline. The patient should be kept warm and quiet. The biological half life of dexamethasone in plasma is about 190 minutes

The growth of children and adolescents receiving orally inhaled corticosteroids, including QVAR, should be monitored routinely (., via stadiometry). If a child or adolescent on any corticosteroid appears to have growth suppression, the possibility that he/she is particularly sensitive to this effect should be considered. The potential growth effects of prolonged treatment should be weighed against clinical benefits obtained and the risks associated with alternative therapies. To minimize the systemic effects of orally inhaled corticosteroids, including QVAR, each patient should be titrated to his/her lowest effective dose [see Dosage and Administration ( )] .

In patients who have received more than physiological doses of systemic corticosteroids (approximately mg prednisolone or equivalent) for greater than 3 weeks, withdrawal should not be abrupt. How dose reduction should be carried out depends largely on whether the disease is likely to relapse as the dose of systemic corticosteroids is reduced. Clinical assessment of disease activity may be needed during withdrawal. If the disease is unlikely to relapse on withdrawal of systemic corticosteroids but there is uncertainty about HPA suppression, the dose of systemic corticosteroid may be reduced rapidly to physiological doses. Once a daily dose equivalent to of prednisolone is reached, dose reduction should be slower to allow the HPA-axis to recover.

  • Prevent asthma symptoms from occurring
  • Can reduce and/or prevent:
    • Inflammation and scarring in the airways
    • Tightening of the muscle bands around the airways (bronchospasm)
  • Do not show immediate results, but work slowly over time
  • Should be taken daily, even when you are not having symptoms
  • Should NOT be used to relieve immediate asthma symptoms.

Back to top A Note about Long-Term Controller Medicines in Children According to the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program at the National Institutes of Health, long-term controller medicines should be considered when infants or young children have had three or more episodes of wheezing in the previous 12 months and who are at an increased risk of developing asthma because of their own or their parents' history of allergic diseases.

They also recommend long-term controller medicines for children who need short-acting bronchodilators (rescue medicines) more than twice a week or have had severe asthma symptoms less than six weeks apart. Without a controller medicine, the underlying inflammation will continue to cause more asthma symptoms.

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© 2015 Palo Alto Medical Foundation. All rights reserved. Sutter Health is a registered trademark of Sutter Health®, Reg. Patent. & Trademark office.
Serving communities around Palo Alto, Mountain View, Fremont, San Jose, San Francisco, Oakland, Dublin, San Mateo & Santa Cruz.

Oral corticosteroids pharmacology

oral corticosteroids pharmacology

  • Prevent asthma symptoms from occurring
  • Can reduce and/or prevent:
    • Inflammation and scarring in the airways
    • Tightening of the muscle bands around the airways (bronchospasm)
  • Do not show immediate results, but work slowly over time
  • Should be taken daily, even when you are not having symptoms
  • Should NOT be used to relieve immediate asthma symptoms.

Back to top A Note about Long-Term Controller Medicines in Children According to the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program at the National Institutes of Health, long-term controller medicines should be considered when infants or young children have had three or more episodes of wheezing in the previous 12 months and who are at an increased risk of developing asthma because of their own or their parents' history of allergic diseases.

They also recommend long-term controller medicines for children who need short-acting bronchodilators (rescue medicines) more than twice a week or have had severe asthma symptoms less than six weeks apart. Without a controller medicine, the underlying inflammation will continue to cause more asthma symptoms.

Back to top
  • Site Map
© 2015 Palo Alto Medical Foundation. All rights reserved. Sutter Health is a registered trademark of Sutter Health®, Reg. . Patent. & Trademark office.
Serving communities around Palo Alto, Mountain View, Fremont, San Jose, San Francisco, Oakland, Dublin, San Mateo & Santa Cruz.

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