Steroid abuse treatment centers

Tetrahydrogestrinone (THG) - Commonly known as The Clear, Tetrahydrogestrinone (THG is a type of steroid that had only been recently placed into scheduling as of 2005 and is noted unapproved by FDA. It basically binds with the androgen receptor instead of estrogen which makes it effective in increasing endurance for athletes. According to history, this was the secret of winning for the gold medalist Marion Jones, a sprinter athlete. However, longer association with this type of steroid can lead to infertility in both male and female. Using the steroids abuse test kit, a person may be held liable for a positive THG steroid test.

Laws and Penalties:  Concerns over growing illegal AAS abuse by teenagers, and many of the just discussed long-term effects, led Congress in 1991 to place the whole AAS class of drugs into Schedule III of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).  Under this legislation, AAS are defined as any drug or hormonal substance, chemically and pharmacologically related to T (other than estrogens, progestins, and corticosteroids) that promotes muscle growth.  The possession or sale of AAS without a valid prescription is illegal.  Since 1991, simple possession of illegally obtained AAS carry a maximum penalty of one year in prison and a minimum $1,000 fine if this is an individual’s first drug offense.  The maximum penalty for trafficking (selling or possessing enough to be suspected of selling) is five years in prison and a fine of $250,000 if this is the individual’s first felony drug offense.  If this is the second felony drug offense, the maximum period of imprisonment and the maximum fine both double.  While the above listed penalties are for federal offenses, individual states have also implemented fines and penalties for illegal use of AAS.  State executive offices have also recognized the seriousness of AAS abuse and other drugs of abuse in schools. For example, the State of Virginia enacted a law that will allow student drug testing as a legitimate school drug prevention program (48, 49).

Intravenously administered glucocorticoids , such as prednisone , are the standard of care in acute GvHD [7] and chronic GVHD. [24] The use of these glucocorticoids is designed to suppress the T-cell-mediated immune onslaught on the host tissues; however, in high doses, this immune-suppression raises the risk of infections and cancer relapse. Therefore, it is desirable to taper off the post-transplant high-level steroid doses to lower levels, at which point the appearance of mild GVHD may be welcome, especially in HLA mis-matched patients, as it is typically associated with a graft-versus-tumor effect. [ citation needed ] . Cyclosporine and tacrolimus are inhibitors of calcineurin. Both substances are structurally different but have the same mechanism of action. Cyclosporin binds to the cytosolic protein Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A (known as cyclophilin), while tacrolimus binds to the cytosolic protein Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase FKBP12. These complexes inhibit calcineurin, block dephosphorylation of the transcription factor NFAT of activated T-cells and its translocation into the nucleus [25] . Standard prophylaxis involves the use of cyclosporine for six months with methotrexate. Cyclosporin levels should be maintained above 200 ng/ml [26] . Other substances that have been studied for GvHD prophylaxis include, for example: sirolism, pentostatin and alemtuzamab [27] .

Common (1% to 10%): Sinusitis, nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection, bronchitis
Uncommon (% to 1%): Cough, dyspnea, snoring, dysphonia
Rare (less than %): Pulmonary microembolism (POME) (cough, dyspnea, malaise, hyperhidrosis, chest pain, dizziness, paresthesia, or syncope) caused by oily solutions
Frequency not reported: Sleep apnea
Postmarketing reports: Chest pain, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hyperventilation, obstructive airway disorder, pharyngeal edema, pharyngolaryngeal pain, pulmonary embolism, respiratory distress, rhinitis, sleep apnea syndrome [ Ref ]

Steroid abuse treatment centers

steroid abuse treatment centers

Common (1% to 10%): Sinusitis, nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection, bronchitis
Uncommon (% to 1%): Cough, dyspnea, snoring, dysphonia
Rare (less than %): Pulmonary microembolism (POME) (cough, dyspnea, malaise, hyperhidrosis, chest pain, dizziness, paresthesia, or syncope) caused by oily solutions
Frequency not reported: Sleep apnea
Postmarketing reports: Chest pain, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hyperventilation, obstructive airway disorder, pharyngeal edema, pharyngolaryngeal pain, pulmonary embolism, respiratory distress, rhinitis, sleep apnea syndrome [ Ref ]

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